Tern announces a more affordable version of its popular electric cargo bike

Taiwanese electric bike company Tern has announced a more affordable version of its popular line of cargo bikes. The Tern Quick Haul is just as sleek and approachable as the company’s other bikes, but with a slightly discounted sticker price.

Tern’s GSD and HSD models have been in demand for years by customers looking for powerful, high-quality e-bikes with plenty of luggage space. Now the company is introducing a slightly smaller model for urban customers who care as much about parking and storage as they do transporting children or groceries.

Another important selling point is the starting price. The Quick Haul range comes in two models: the D8, a Class 1 e-bike with a top speed of 20 mph, which starts at $2,999; and the P9, a Class 3 motorcycle with a top speed of 28 mph, starting at $3,999. A third model, the P5i, will be launched in Europe first and other markets will follow.

That may still be too expensive for some customers, but it represents a discount compared to Tern’s earlier models, which include the GSD ($5,499 for single battery configuration, $6,299 for the dual battery) and the HSD (which starts at $3,199). Anyway, when it comes to cargo bikes, I don’t try to compare them to other non-electric bikes, but to the car I’m trying to replace. According to that section, the e-bike is always the cheapest option.

Tern says it priced the Quick Haul to qualify for potential tax credits should Congress pass the E-Bike Act. The bill is included in President Joe Biden’s Build Back Better social welfare package, which is currently stalled in Congress. Tern and other companies hope the bill can survive even if lawmakers fail to reach a consensus on Biden’s plan.

Plus, Tern’s e-bikes are pricey because the company builds them with some of the best parts and components in the industry. The Quick Haul is no different, with its Bosch Active Line Plus or Performance Line Sport motor and Shimano Nexus 5 hub. The P5i model comes with a Gates carbon belt drive, which is quite popular with e-bike manufacturers these days as it is cleaner and easier to maintain than traditional metal chain drives.

The Tern Quick Haul is also distinguished by its modularity. With a maximum total weight of 150 kg, the Quick Haul is a comfortable ride for a child or even a second adult. The saddle and stem are adjustable, which means that the bike can be used by people of different heights.

The Quick Haul is shorter than Tern’s previous models, and with a low center of gravity, it should easily maneuver through narrow city streets or transit hubs such as subway or bus stations. And the rear rack doubles as a kickstand if you want to park the bike vertically, which is a great space saver for anyone who keeps their bike in their apartment. And while the handlebars don’t fold down, unlike Tern’s other models, the Quick Haul is compatible with the company’s vast constellation of accessories, including the Clubhouse, Storm Box and Storm Shield.

Interestingly, Tern is also marketing the Quick Haul as a perfect bike for delivery companies. With its sturdy frame and payload capacity, the company says this model is a “reliable workhorse” for any business looking to expand its delivery options. The company has long sought to position itself as a commercial partner alongside a consumer-oriented brand.

Frank Broholm had acquired considerable experience in writing and editing publications before recruited by The Media Today Chronicle News portal as Editorial Manager. His key task is to conduct effective business reviews based on the most recent business…